Volume 1, Issue 1, November 2016, Page: 1-8
Psychosocial and Demographic Factors as Predictors of Attitude Towards Mental Illness by Caregivers in Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital Aro Abeokuta
Idoko Joseph Onyebuchukwu, Counselling Centre, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria
Evbuoma Kikelomo Idowu, Department of Psychology, School of Human Resource Development, College of Leadership & Development Studies, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria
Agoha Benedict Chico Emerenwa, Department of Psychology, School of Human Resource Development, College of Leadership & Development Studies, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria
Oyeyemi Kunle, Counselling Centre, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria
Received: Jul. 14, 2016;       Accepted: Aug. 25, 2016;       Published: Oct. 19, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.rs.20160101.11      View  2469      Downloads  63
Abstract
This study investigated general health, self efficacy, social support and demographic variables as predictors of attitude to mental illness and care givers burden of psychiatric patients. For the study, five hypotheses were tested, one was confirmed, while four were partially confirmed. The study used 200 participants (89 (44.5%) males and 111 (55.5%) females) who are caregivers at the Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital Aro-Abeokuta. An 89 item questionnaire was used to tap information on the care givers’ demographic and psychological variables. Multistage sampling technique was used. The study adopted multiple regression, 2x2x2x2x2 analysis of variance and Manova to test the significance of the demographic and psychosocial variables on attitude to mental illness and care givers burden of psychiatric patients.
Keywords
General Health, Self Efficacy, Social Support, Demographic, Attitude, Mental Illness and Care Givers
To cite this article
Idoko Joseph Onyebuchukwu, Evbuoma Kikelomo Idowu, Agoha Benedict Chico Emerenwa, Oyeyemi Kunle, Psychosocial and Demographic Factors as Predictors of Attitude Towards Mental Illness by Caregivers in Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital Aro Abeokuta, Rehabilitation Science. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2016, pp. 1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.rs.20160101.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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